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  •   Harry Ganavas liked this post about 3 hours ago
    Managed to get out in the workshop and do a bit of work on the bus. Decided to try and get the rear safari finished off - or at least a bit closer to being finished. Spent some time mating the two halves of the frame together with simple joining plates. Also procured some rubber seals for the... Managed to get out in the workshop and do a bit of work on the bus. Decided to try and get the rear safari finished off - or at least a bit closer to being finished. Spent some time mating the two halves of the frame together with simple joining plates. Also procured some rubber seals for the tailgate and to hold the glass in.

    The door itself needed a bit of cleaning up so I removed the old inner trim panel and curtain rails along with the remnants of an old light fitting and an external handle. There's a few dents and dings to fix up but the door is completely rust free, which is more than I can say about my old door.

    So with the door stripped down I was able to install the hinge and frame into the door along with the pinch seal that I bought. The frame closes up nicely against the seal, although there is a little flex in the frame without the glass that shouldn't be evident after the glass is fitted. All that's really left to do now is figure out how to adapt the bug quarter window latches to work with the safari and make up some stays for the side. Not a massive amount of work. Hopefully I can get to the point of a trial installation next weekend.
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  • So it looks like my new screen surround and hood frame may finally be on the way. I ordered it back in February and it has taken this long to get built. Can't wait for it to arrive, looking forwards to getting the car weather tight (well as weather-tight as you can get with a speedster). Will be... So it looks like my new screen surround and hood frame may finally be on the way. I ordered it back in February and it has taken this long to get built. Can't wait for it to arrive, looking forwards to getting the car weather tight (well as weather-tight as you can get with a speedster). Will be good for it to be more car than bathtub. More
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  • Didn't get to do any work on the bus this weekend as I had another welcome distraction; I picked up a Bridgeport mill that I bought from work. For those who do not know, the Bridgeport is a universal milling machine with adjustable head, power head and this one also has power feed on the cross... Didn't get to do any work on the bus this weekend as I had another welcome distraction; I picked up a Bridgeport mill that I bought from work. For those who do not know, the Bridgeport is a universal milling machine with adjustable head, power head and this one also has power feed on the cross slide. This is a bit of an upgrade from my smaller mill and will increase my ability to make metal chips a fair bit. For the most part my smaller mill is good enough as it is large enough to bore cases and fly-cut heads and for the odd job I do in steel it works okay. Boring is a bit of a chore as there is no quill and no power feed so I have to raise the knee to bore which is hard work. The Bridgeport will certainly seem like a luxury in comparison. It is also big enough to take the 8" vertex rotary table that I own which means that I will finally be able to look at making some toothed pulleys for my blower kits (the rotary table is about a big as my little mill itself)

    I also picked up a larger shop press. It needs a little bit of work as it has a leaky cylinder but is rated at 55 Ton. It makes my old 12 Ton shop press look like a toy. For the most part the 12 Ton press was fine for disassembling blowers and the odd jobs that it generally gets used for but on the odd occasion it gets close to its capacity.

    Also received a delivery of goodies for the new engine including 1.4 ratio rockers, retainers, cut to length aluminium pushrods and a set of 90.5 P&Cs
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  • Did a bit more work on the heads this weekend. Yesterday I modified the jig I had made to allow me to counterbore the holes for the spark plugs and had a go at machining the test head. Unfortunately there is a LOT of vibration when milling through the fins and the jig didn't last past the first... Did a bit more work on the heads this weekend. Yesterday I modified the jig I had made to allow me to counterbore the holes for the spark plugs and had a go at machining the test head. Unfortunately there is a LOT of vibration when milling through the fins and the jig didn't last past the first hole. In fact the jig came apart and the hole became elongated.

    So today I decided that a more substantial jig was needed. I knocked up a new jig using 6mm plate and drilled it to accept the head in the two orientations required for machining the inside and outside holes. The head simply bolts to the plate using the rocker shaft bolts or through the mounting holes - depending on which side you are drilling from. I also allowed some clearance from the side to make it easier to clamp to the table. The initial wooden version could only be clamped from the rear which was not too great.

    I tested it by boring the second hole on the test head, the result was much better. No movement, vibration massively reduced and a much cleaner cut. With the machining completed for the spark plugs the only thing I have left to do it tap the threads. I'll need to get an M10x1mm tap for this as I only have regular M10x1.25's.

    I also spent a bit more time evening up the chambers and un-shrouding the valves. I'm still waiting for new valve guides to arrive so cannot cut the valve seats yet which is a bit annoying as I really want to cc the heads to find out where I am. I have a feeling that I still need to remove a bit more material to get the compression ratio where I want it but will hold off until the valves are fitted and the heads cc'd. (it's easy to remove material but not so easy to add it if I go too far.) I also added a second set of Singh grooves pointing towards the second plug.

    So the heads are really not too far off from being finished. I'm (mostly) happy with the porting (maybe a bit more from the exhaust floor), the chambers are reasonable considering that it's a stock casting with no welding and the machining for the second set of plugs was a success.

    I think that I'm just going to fit these heads back on to the stock motor and run them. I've ordered a bunch of stuff to build up a 1776 which leaves me with a 1600 long block doing nothing so I might as well put these heads back on it and do some more dyno testing. The new cam will go into an AS41 case that I have along with the counterweighted crank, a new set of 80.5 P&C's, a new set of 4140 H-beam rods and a new pair of heads. If the dyno testing shows some reasonable figures I'll buy some new stock heads and port them myself, else I might invest in a set of Panchitos.
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  • Spent a bit of time out in the workshop today. I fly-cut the other head and cut in the Singh grooves using a modified file. I previously used a Dremel but the slots were not uniform so I heated up and bent a triangular file and used that instead. The finish is much better now and it is much... Spent a bit of time out in the workshop today. I fly-cut the other head and cut in the Singh grooves using a modified file. I previously used a Dremel but the slots were not uniform so I heated up and bent a triangular file and used that instead. The finish is much better now and it is much easier to align the slots so that they point directly at the spark plug.

    I also drilled the holes for a second set of plugs. I did this on a scrap head just in case, but they went in really easy. The main purpose of the exercise was to make sure that the alignment was good and that the spark plugs cleared the push rod tubes. All I need to do now is to counter bore the holes from the opposite side to form the seat for the spark plug. I also need to get hold of a set of 10mm spark plugs to test everything out with.

    I cleaned up my new heads today to discover that one head had cracks. Could have sworn that they weren't there when I bought them. Guess I did not check close enough. At any rate, one head was okay. I'll pair this with the one head that I have that is also okay. Only issue is one is a type 3 and one is a bug head which means the inlet ports are massively different. Nothing that a little time with the Dremel cannot fix. Managed to get one port done, will do the other tomorrow.
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  • The last bit of work I managed to get done was to knock up a jig for adding a second pair of spark plugs...
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  • As well as doing a bit of work on the engine I also decided to fit the adjustable spring plates that I got from Pat Brown.

    My old spring plates were only supposed to be a temporary measure and were more than a bit of a hack job (just check out the photos to see what I mean), so it was long...
    As well as doing a bit of work on the engine I also decided to fit the adjustable spring plates that I got from Pat Brown.

    My old spring plates were only supposed to be a temporary measure and were more than a bit of a hack job (just check out the photos to see what I mean), so it was long overdue that they were replaced. Swapping the old and new spring plates was pretty straight forwards with the only real 'issue' being that the brake line to the caliper runs through a hole in the old spring plate so the spring plate needed to be cut to remove it. The new spring plates are slotted to accommodate the brake line. Once fitted I took some time to set the height so that I could measure up for new rear shocks. One of the rear shock bolts had come undone causing some damage to the shock. These are stock length units and are too long so it's time for some new ones to go along with the new spring plates.

    For future reference, with the rim level with the wheel arch the shock length is 15 1/2"

    I can totally recommend Pats spring plates and the other VW goodies that he makes. Top quality gear.
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  • Did a fair bit of work over the long weekend, just haven't had a chance to post it yet.

    First thing I did was to make a an arbor and cutter for decking heads. I considered buying one already made, they're not really that expensive, but decided to make one. For me this is half the fun of...
    Did a fair bit of work over the long weekend, just haven't had a chance to post it yet.

    First thing I did was to make a an arbor and cutter for decking heads. I considered buying one already made, they're not really that expensive, but decided to make one. For me this is half the fun of tinkering with old cars. Not just the job itself, but making the tools to do the job. I turned down some aluminium stock to fit a steel spigot. I then milled to the aluminium arbor to accept standard HSS tool stock. I ground the tool stock with a 5 degree clearance on the face and underside. I left the end of the tool as it was but the cut finish dod not come out too great on the internal diameter so will regrind this.

    The results were acceptable. a small amount of noise from the cut, mostly as my mill does not go slow enough but the finish is easily good enough and will make a nice seal with some minor lapping.

    I also fitted the exhaust valve seats into the head. I stored the seats in the deep freeze overnight and heated the heads up on the BBQ. The seats tapped in nice and easy. I then started to cut the seats but was not happy with the play in the valve guide. I initially thought this okay but after cleaning everything up there is a little too much play with the valve in the guide. I've got some new ones on order so will wait until I've fitted those before finishing the seats off
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  • So a few steps forwards followed by a few steps backwards. Picked up some stainless valves and a 69mm counterweighted crank at the weekend. My valve seat cutters arrived and I finished porting the heads so was pretty much on track for finishing off the heads this weekend. That was until I... So a few steps forwards followed by a few steps backwards. Picked up some stainless valves and a 69mm counterweighted crank at the weekend. My valve seat cutters arrived and I finished porting the heads so was pretty much on track for finishing off the heads this weekend. That was until I noticed that there were cracks in the exhaust chamber bowls. Hadn't noticed this before as the bowls were pretty dirty and it is not an area that needs material removed so they only showed up after I gave the ports a bit of a sand and polish.

    Not put off I decided to try and weld the ports, I prepped the outside of the crack and managed to get some beads laid down but just could not get a bead to take inside the port. After a few attempts I gave up.

    I ended up moving on to another spare pair of heads that I had (the test heads) figuring that I could simply replace the recessed exhaust seats once the porting was finished. So I ported these and researched removing and fitting exhaust seats. In the process I discovered that the seats are made from a variety of materials including 4140. As I had some 4140 I decided to make up my own ports. All I need to do not is fit them.

    Something else I decided to have a go at is making my own flow bench. I didn't get too far but did manage to make a pressure take off point from an old spark plug - basically remove the insides and then tap for 3/4" NPT and fit a barbed fitting. Still left to do is make the manometer and a calibration plate to allow me to be able to map the characteristics of the bench which will allow me to read in CFM. Will be interesting to see what these heads flow.
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  • So got to work on the heads today. Had a few hiccups along the way. My Chinese Dremel's flexible extension decided to melt itself into a tangled mess. It felt a bit hot, then there was smoke and then it kinda tangled itself into a knot and stalled the motor. So I went out and bought a proper... So got to work on the heads today. Had a few hiccups along the way. My Chinese Dremel's flexible extension decided to melt itself into a tangled mess. It felt a bit hot, then there was smoke and then it kinda tangled itself into a knot and stalled the motor. So I went out and bought a proper Dremel extension with a mini chuck. I'm hoping this one will last a bit longer, not that I'm complaining about the old one, I've had it a few years and it's done a fair bit of work.

    Next drama was that I didn't tighten the new mini chuck enough and it proceeded to throw my carbide burr across the workshop. I heard it hit the wall of the garage. After pulling everything apart and searching for nearly an hour I gave up and went out and bought another burr. Typically I could not buy exactly the same burr. but the one I got was close enough.

    So with the dramas sorted I managed to get all the exhaust ports done and one of the inlets. To do the inlets I decided to remove the guides and smooth out the guide boss. I also took the opportunity to shorten the guides by 5mm and taper the ends. This opens up the port area a fair bit as the stock guide pretty much sits in the port and obstructs it. I blended the roof a little and smoothed around the guide boss but didn't really do too much else. Will finish the other three some time during the week.
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  • Made a side by side photo of a stock exhaust valve and the ported valve I did earlier - a before and after comparison. As you can see the stock exhaust valve is pretty ordinary. What's worse is that the slow curve - the one at the top of the photo - is literally like a sharp ridge that is the... Made a side by side photo of a stock exhaust valve and the ported valve I did earlier - a before and after comparison. As you can see the stock exhaust valve is pretty ordinary. What's worse is that the slow curve - the one at the top of the photo - is literally like a sharp ridge that is the whole width of the port. You cannot see this in the photo as it is hidden from view, the only way to know that it is there is to feel it with your finger.
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  • Made a start on the engine today. First order of business was to knock up a bench-top spring compressor. I've been meaning to pick one of these up for a while now as my manual one is a bit cumbersome to use. As I needed to do some head work today I decided that I couldn't wait any longer so... Made a start on the engine today. First order of business was to knock up a bench-top spring compressor. I've been meaning to pick one of these up for a while now as my manual one is a bit cumbersome to use. As I needed to do some head work today I decided that I couldn't wait any longer so decided to build one. A quick rummage through the scrap pile and a couple of hours later I had knocked one up. Works great. I will post up some more photos and a step-by-step to the garage group.

    With the spring compressor done it was time to strip down one of the spare heads that I have. I wanted to use it to practice porting rather than just jump in on my good heads and potentially ruin them. These heads need new seats so it didn't matter if things didn't work out 100%

    I started off with the exhaust valve. This exhaust port is very badly designed and has a massive ridge in the slow side of the port. It also has a lumpy valve guide boss which gets in the way a bit. The idea is to smooth out the ridge and the the lumps to the side of the boss whilst trying to retain as much of the boss as possible. Not going overboard on the boss is especially important on a forced induction engine as it tends to see higher port temperatures. If the thermal mass around the boss is removed the exhaust valve will run hotter which can potentially result in stretched or dropped valves.

    With the ridge and lumps smoothed out the only thing left to do is to blend the seats into the port, match the outlet to the manifold and give it a light sand.

    The intakes are much less work, all there is really to do here is blend the seats into the ports and match the intakes to the manifolds. There was a small amount of cleaning up to do around the guide boss but not much.

    In both cases I removed the valve guides to get better access. I ended up using a tool I made 20 years ago when I changed the valve guides on my Triumph 13/60. It's been floating around in my toolbox ever since. Glad I kept it now.

    With the ports done I turned to the chambers. I had already done a little un-shrouding on these heads before, but decided that they could do with a little more. Basically the shrouded area to the outside of the valves needs to be taken out to the inside of the cylinder boss and then blended back with the rest of the chamber opposite the spark plug. The area near to the plug is basically left alone.

    It took about 4 hours to get one practice head mostly done. It still needs about another hour on it to sand and polish but I decided to skip this as I decided it would be better to spend the time on the actual heads. At some point I will return to those heads and attempt to do the valve seats at which point I will finish off the porting. I'm pretty happy with how they came out.

    So with the practice under my belt I decided to move on to the engine. I got it up on the engine stand and started to strip it down. With the heads off I noticed that the inlets are substantially different to the heads that I just ported. There is a massive guide boss in the inlet ports. This means either the heads I practiced on were already ported (possible) or they have a different inlet port design (also possible as these are type 3 heads). I will strip the heads tomorrow and male a start.

    One thing that I noted was that on the heads I ported the valve guide should ideally be about 10mm shorter. I will modify the guides on the other heads when I get them as I will be fitting new guides. I took a bunch of photos trying to get a good view of the port work but it was really hard to get a decent shot. It should be fairly easy to see the difference between the stock and modified exhaust port, however the one thing you cannot see is the ridge. You can only feel this with your finger as it is hidden in the depths of the port.

    On my list of things to do is make a flow bench. It would be great to have this now as I could use it to test the heads. Will have to see if I can scavenge enough parts to make one. Anyone got a spare vacuum cleaner they don't need?
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  •   Mick's 70 Lowlight commented on this post about 1 month ago
    Mick's 70 Lowlight changed the cover photo
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  • More goodies arrived today. This time the inlet filter. This a UK product and comes complete with integrated velocity stack, which is what attracted me to this particular style. It is size perfect for the throttle body that I am using and could either be mounted direct to the throttle body with... More goodies arrived today. This time the inlet filter. This a UK product and comes complete with integrated velocity stack, which is what attracted me to this particular style. It is size perfect for the throttle body that I am using and could either be mounted direct to the throttle body with a small amount of turning, or it can be mounted using the supplied silicone hose. No flow restrictions here. This is the same filter that I am planning on supplying with the EFI kit. More
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  • Got some more pieces of the puzzle in place today. Managed to source a 69mm counterweighted crank locally, along with a set of stainless valves and cut to length push rods. Also found a nice set of Engle #6002 HD single springs on thesamba. The plan is to use singles as I doubt that the bus is... Got some more pieces of the puzzle in place today. Managed to source a 69mm counterweighted crank locally, along with a set of stainless valves and cut to length push rods. Also found a nice set of Engle #6002 HD single springs on thesamba. The plan is to use singles as I doubt that the bus is going to see extend periods up at 6.5k rpm. Found some titanium retainers as well, just not 100% whether I will pull the trigger on those. Waiting to hear back for postage costs. Would be good for valve-train weight though.

    Did pull the trigger on some valve seat cutters, a must if I'm going to remove the guides, port the heads, fit new valves and do a nice 3 angle valve job. Quite looking forwards to working through this process. It's not something that I've done with VW heads before. I'm interested to see what I can achieve.
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  •   Mick's 70 Lowlight commented on this post about 1 month ago
    Discovered that DPR have counterweighted cranks on promotion for $US125. Now I'm debating on whether to get one. Price is so cheap it's rude not to and I guess if I'm going to try and see what I can get from a 1600 I might as well start with a fighting chance. The cam I have revs out to about... Discovered that DPR have counterweighted cranks on promotion for $US125. Now I'm debating on whether to get one. Price is so cheap it's rude not to and I guess if I'm going to try and see what I can get from a 1600 I might as well start with a fighting chance. The cam I have revs out to about 6-6.5k which is pushing the friendship a little on a stock crank as they have a tendency to flex which results in increased bearing wear if running it for extended periods. Not that it will see 6.5k too often with the new gearbox.

    Emailed a few people with 1.5 ratio lifters for sale as the custom cam I've got in works with 1.4. / 1.5 lifters. My plan is to run with single HD springs. I would imagine that for 99.9% of the time I'm not going to see anywhere near 6.5k rpm so there is no need for duals, plus the lower spring pressure will help take some load off of the valve train.

    Matching spring pressures is a bit of a balancing act - you want enough to avoid float at the higher rpm's but not any more. Reducing the reciprocating mass of the valve train components will allow you to reduce the needed spring pressure, as the springs will not have as much work to do. For this reason I will stick with standard aluminium push rods. Titanium valves and retainers would be nice but a little outside of the budget for this build so I'll be using stainless valves when I rebuild the heads. I'm pretty confident that with the right choice singles will work really well in this application and the stainless valves are a necessity given the head temps that a blown engine can get to.
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  • Got some goodies in the post today. My sidewinder exhaust arrived from Classic Vee Dub. The quality is not bad, in fact it's pretty darn good when you consider it was only $430!!! It's a 1 1/2" early-bay stainless steel system that ends in a 2 1/4" muffler. The muffler looks massive, hopefully... Got some goodies in the post today. My sidewinder exhaust arrived from Classic Vee Dub. The quality is not bad, in fact it's pretty darn good when you consider it was only $430!!! It's a 1 1/2" early-bay stainless steel system that ends in a 2 1/4" muffler. The muffler looks massive, hopefully it doesn't need modding to fit. The collector is a reasonable length and should flow better than the typical bell shaped collector you see on most cheapo exhausts which was my main reason for choosing this style of system. Sure it's not a CSP Python, but then it didn't cost me the wrong side of $1500.

    I'd say that the quality and finish is not quite up to the same as the Vintage Speed system I had previously fitted to the bus but then it's not really too bad either. There's a little bit of cleaning up to do inside the collector but nothing that 10 minutes and a die grinder could not sort out. Also need to weld an O2 bung in there for the AFR Sensor and check that my J-Pipes will fit.

    Really looking forwards to getting this build together and seeing how everything works together.
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  • So I managed to do jack shit on the bus today, well no physical work at any rate. I did do a fair bit of 'research' which loosely translated means that I spent half of the day googling shit on the internet. As a result of this I've come to the decision that I'm going to pull the engine down, put... So I managed to do jack shit on the bus today, well no physical work at any rate. I did do a fair bit of 'research' which loosely translated means that I spent half of the day googling shit on the internet. As a result of this I've come to the decision that I'm going to pull the engine down, put the cam in and do some work on the heads. I toyed with the idea of just buying some heads already done, after all those CB Panchito heads look pretty good, but I think that they may be a little too big for a 1600.

    Buying heads and moving to a larger capacity is the easy option, the blower kits were always about making more power with the stock 1600, so I figure if I'm going to offer a custom cam I might as well see what I can do with stock valve sizes and stock ported heads. It fits in with the progression of mods that I've performed so far. I can always get another cam and build another motor.

    Another part of the decision is that with everything else that I have going on (developing the EFI system and a new blower kit), building another motor would be at the very least a few months down the track and I am keen to get the new cam tested out. Plus even if I did manage to put the motor together relatively quickly, which is kind of unlikely. Having just installed a motor in the bus I doubt that I would be very keen to remove it and swap it out again.

    So it looks like the bus will not be back together as quickly as I would like, as I'm adding in some extra time to pull the engine down. But it will allow me to spend the time to blueprint the engine and hopefully push the boundaries of what a 1600 can produce a little further. I might even employ a few tricks that I've put into the LSR engine to test them out.

    Watch this space...
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  • Did a little bit of work on the bus today. Spent some time pondering on coil locations and whether to go with a coil near / on plug solution or just stick with the trusty wasted spark setup. I also had a rummage through the EFI parts stash and dug out a fuel pump and turbo regulator. Need to... Did a little bit of work on the bus today. Spent some time pondering on coil locations and whether to go with a coil near / on plug solution or just stick with the trusty wasted spark setup. I also had a rummage through the EFI parts stash and dug out a fuel pump and turbo regulator. Need to figure out where to mount these but first need to figure out which is the outlet and which is the return on the fuel tank. (I have NFI).

    Finally replaced my blown grinder with a new one. $21 well spent. Splashed out on a new disc arbor and some discs as well. Spent a few hours tidying up the tin wear where I had welded it up. Just need to take it into work and use the shot blasting cabinet to remove the paint before applying some new satin black. Also installed the oil filter bypass (although I must have missed taking a photo of it.)

    Been toying with the idea of tearing the long block down and installing my new prototype cam. Can't quite make my mind up. I've got a sidewinder exhaust on the way so it's very tempting to take things to the next level (keeping to 1600cc of course). However, to take advantage of the cam I would need to do some head work which is a bunch of hours work. Plus if I'm going down that path I really should look to do something with the crank and rods. So I dug out a pair of heads from the junk pile and my copy of 'hot-rodding the VW engine' to take a look at what's involved in porting them.

    I had planned to build up another engine to test the cam out. I've got pretty much most parts to build up a 2180 but figure that in reality it will be a while before I can get around to doing that, so adding it to the bus engine seems like a good idea. Plus as it's my daily it'll get some good use. I can always get another cam.

    Decisions, decisions, decisions...
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